SARAH HELEN MORE

Bend, OR

Biography          CV          Statement

“My work deals with the interaction of color and pattern as well as the complicated relationship between the digital and the handmade. Crafted without the use of tapes or masking films, each piece appears to be created digitally. However, upon closer inspection, one sees evidence of the hand in the form of slight human imperfections that reveal the true nature of each object. This process of making provides me with both a meditative and dynamic experience.”

– Sarah Helen More

THE BALLAD OF SADIE ROSE

40 X 26.5″ gouache on paper

3000.

COLLECT

UPCOMING EXHIBITION

 

COLOR CURE

an invitational exhibition

May 6th – June 26th, 2021

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS I’LL NEVER ASK

23 X 30″ gouache on paper

2500.

COLLECT

RED RHAPSODY

22 X 20″ gouache on paper – framed

2400.

COLLECT

UNTITLED CASTLE

16 X 20″ gouache on illustration board

1700.

COLLECT

EYE SEE YOU SEE ME

12 X 18″ gouache on paper

1200.

COLLECT

“I am inspired by traditional methods of textile construction, and I tend to work the canvas as I would if I were weaving, one “weft” at a time, building the piece from a concentrated area out.”

— Sarah More

ABSTRACTION #30

12 X 12″ gouache on water color panel

1000.

COLLECT

CABIN FEVER

11 X 11″ gouache on paper

1000.

COLLECT

“I implement sets of formal rules onto my canvases, not always having a clear understanding of the final piece. Beginning with an underlying structure drawn in pencil, this process allows me to ride the line between control and accident, and while some components are clear from the beginning, others reveal themselves as each piece unfolds.” 

– Sarah More

GARDEN GATE IN SPRING

14 X 11″ gouache on paper

900.

COLLECT

GARDEN GATE IN WINTER

14 X 11″ gouache on paper

900.

COLLECT

GARDEN GATE DECEMBER NIGHT

14 X 11″ gouache on paper

900.

COLLECT

PRESS for COLOR CURE

4.22.21

create! MAGAZINE 

“Historically trivialized, color in art has been perceived by critics as frivolous and purely decorative. Like the pioneers of Abstract Expressionism in the late 1940s paving the way with their explosions of color on canvas, these artists posit a yearning for the expressive power of color as a cure for the soul and a visual elixir.”