EDIE OVERTURF

Portland, OR

Biography          CV          Statement

“Even defining my creative practice changes week to week. But there are elements that have remained throughout nearly a decade. I’m interested in the difference between storytelling and truthtelling. From the idea of a “reliable narrator”, to the stories we tell ourselves for comfort. How does one distinguish storytelling from truthtelling?”

– Edie Overturf

CYCLES

27 X 32″ framed, woodcut and screenprint

800.

COLLECT

“The form of the pennant flag and the emotive quality of my color choices are at odds with the language I present. My work uses the relationship of image and language to formulate the narratives. The form of the pennant flag and the emotive quality of my color choices are at odds with the language I present. The pennant flag (or bunting flag) is generally an object that represents cheer and celebration. But at a time when it is difficult to find room for celebration, the form seems to take on a different meaning. I find it darkly humorous to use the form of the pennant flag with unceremonious or non-celebratory words. It gives me the same feeling as a sarcastic “yaaaay” after expressing frustrations.” 

– Edie Overturf

CRACKS

27 X 32″ framed, woodcut and screenprint

800.

COLLECT

FROM THE ROOFTOP

18 X 24″ colored pencil

500.

COLLECT

BELIEVE IT WHEN I SEE IT

14 X 18″ colored pencil

350.

COLLECT

HAD TO

11 X 14″ colored pencil

300.

COLLECT

“The marquee and pennant flag are ancient modes of advertising, with even fewer characters of expression than a tweet. Although outdated, the brevity of statements parallels the urgency of today’s discourse. ” 

– Edie Overturf

SAY IT AGAIN

16 X 16″ framed linocut

350.

COLLECT

THE FEATURE

11 X 14″ reductive linocut

300.

COLLECT

“I am and will always be in love with the form of the multiple and its equitable access. The history of the multiple is deeply egalitarian, and this appeals to my many socialist ideals. My work being of both a political and personal nature is carried through the vehicle of the multiple, and echoes the long and rich history of political prints.”

– Edie Overturf